HINDI PERSIAN FLAIR

Persian was crucial in the formation of a common language of the Central, North and Northwest regions of the South Asia.

Following the Mughal conquest of South Asia and the resulting vast Islamic empire, especially in the northern and central

regions of the South Asia, a hybrid language of Arabic, Pashto, Turkish, Persian, and local dialects began to form around the

16th and 17th centuries CE, one that would eventually be known as Urdu from a Turkish word meaning “army”, in allusion to the

army barracks of visiting troops.

Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan built a new walled city of Shahjahanabad in Delhi in 1639. The market close to the royal fort Red

Fort came to be called Urdu Bazar and the language was eventually termed “Urdu”. It grew from the interaction often Persian-

speaking Muslim soldiers and native peoples. Soon, the Persian script and Nasta’liq form of cursive was adopted, with

additional figures added to accommodate the South Asian phonetic system, and a new language based on the South Asian grammar

with a vocabulary largely divided between Persian and indirectly some Arabic and local Prakrit dialects. Elements peculiar to

Persian, such as the enclitic ezāfe, and the use of the takhallus, were readily absorbed into Hindustani literature both

religious and secular. This language was developed by Kashmiri Pandits and now a days widely spoken in South Asia.

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satavahana, congress, AICC, indianbanknotes, sonia gandhi, musham damodhar rao, HINDI STAMP, statue of hindi diety, hindi language history, history of hindi, history of telugu, dravidian languages, rahul gndhi

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