Women Army and officials

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Golf Lovers Fantasy Vacation


With more golf courses per square mile than anywhere else on
earth, Bermuda is a dream come true for those who prefer their
sand in a trap instead of on the beach. With greens perched high
atop windswept cliffs and spectacular views of the Atlantic from
nearly every hole, you may find it difficult to concentrate on
those long putts, though.

This tiny nation of a mere 21 square miles is home to ten
courses, many of them designed by such famed architects as
Deveraux Emmett and Charles Blair Macdonald. Some of the most
famous players in history have hit the links in Bermuda,
including Bob Hope, Winston Churchill, and Jack Kennedy, so be
sure to bring your game!

Whether you prefer an activity-filled trip or a quiet time away
from the demands of daily life, this jewel of the Atlantic has
everything you need to make your vacation dreams a reality.
Bermuda’s seven major islands offer a variety of dining,
shopping, and entertainment to suit nearly every taste, all
surrounded by gorgeous beaches and gentle surf. Visit Bermuda,
and you’ll know why it’s called paradise.

Angelina Jolie’s Rote "Salt"


Angelina Jolie’s Contradictions Buoy the Otherwise Rote “Salt”
Salt, a spy flick rewritten for Angelina Jolie after Tom Cruise dropped out, has been publicized as the cinematic equivalent of the 19th Amendment: finally, a level playing field for female action stars! This is mostly bullshit, of course — Jolie’s Evelyn Salt is not the first action hero to be given a gender reassignment between initial conception and opening weekend (cough, Alien), nor is this the first stunt-heavy film Jolie has carried on her back and sold on her name. What is startling about Salt is the extent to which, in insisting on the moral ambiguity of its protagonist for most of its running time, it gives us an action-hero prototype that Cruise couldn’t play and Jolie was born to.
That it flatters the audience by assuming a modicum of intelligence earns points if we’re grading on a curve, but this is still closer to product than art. Highly satisfying, often exhilarating, refreshingly unpretentious product.
@karina

RED light fine in USA


Red light cameras, when misused by idiotic and irresponsible public officials, can be one of the great scourges of America.
That much is fact. Even when they are used with some semblance of jurisprudence, they might be flat-out illegal. We’ll just have to see how the court challenges turn out.
But in the wrong hands they can be downright evil. Check out this Miami Herald story on the poor people of Aventura all others who drive in that city — who are getting shaken down by their own government for hundreds, sometimes thousands of dollars. Their crime Rolling a red light on a right turn. You do it all the time even if you don’t know it. You come up on an intersection, see there’s no cars coming, and never quite come to a complete stop.
In Aventura, this will get you a $125 fine for the first offense, $250 for the second, and a whopping $500 for each additional. It’s obscene and making it worse is that if one of the cameras got installed at a red light near you, you could wrack up multiple fines before you get the notice in the mail telling you did anything wrong in the first place.
Responsible towns don’t do this. Pembroke Pines, which was the first city in Broward to install the cameras (send your thanks to Angelo Castillo), doesn’t do it. West Palm Beach did it for a while, but then realizing how grotesque it was. In May WBP not only discontinued the practice, but decided to refund all the money it generated from such fines back to the citizens who paid them. But some towns just don’t
Courtesy http://blogs.browardpalmbeach.com/pulp/

National Nude Day July15


July 15 Surprising i never thought such day was there??? but is CELEBRATED.
I probably would never have cared that today is ‘National Nude Day’ except that we’re smack in the middle of bikini season. So, let’s lose the procrastination and all the other excuses while losing some weight as well. On any piece of paper use a black pen or marker to draw an outline of a human figure that corresponds to how you believe you look in your current reality. Now, draw a second figure inside that first one that demonstrates or symbolizes what your preferred and perfect shape would resemble. Put this image somewhere where you will see it as soon as you awake each morning and immediately before you go to bed each night. Leave it in this space for the next 49 consecutive days. Inside this same time frame and for a few seconds each day, light a black candle and concentrate on your weight just melting away all the while visualizing what you will look like with your new figure. Give great gratitude to your whole being and body for balancing and dropping the excess each time you light and then blow that candle out. As this candle diminishes day by day, the theory goes, so will you! Pretty weighty stuff, but I do have a couple of clients who have successfully lost the large this way, so it’s up to you to give it a go and give those last ten the heave ho!

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MORE INFO ON ANY TOPIC @ ME DISCUSSED IN THIS BLOG OR ANY NEW ONE TOO

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EGYPTIAN alphabet called hieroglyphics


The ancient Egyptians used their language and alphabet called hieroglyphics on temples and tombs especially to record the history of their Pharaohs and the adventures and conquers of them and to glorify all the Pharoah’s doings.

The ancient Egyptians called their script mdju netjer, or “words of the gods.” Hieroglyphs were the earliest form of Egyptian script, and also the longest-lived.

Egyptian Wedding Day


The Wedding Day

The day of the marriage was really quite simple. The bride merely moved her belongings into the home of her husband. He might be living alone or with his parents.

So what did the bride wear? She probably wore a long dress or tunic made of linen, which may have been covered from head to toe with bead-net. If she owned any gold, silver or lapis, she probably adorned herself with those, too.

Even though there was no official ceremony, knowing how much the ancient Egyptians loved music, dance and food, there were bound to be family celebrations in honor of the uniting couple.

Museums are filled with statues and paintings showing husbands and wives with their arms around each other’s waists, holding hands or offering each other flowers or food. Love and affection was indeed a part of the Egyptian marriage, and our Egyptian bride could expect to be loved and respected by her husband.

Entering into a marriage was described as ‘making a wife’ or ‘taking a wife’, but it seems that the girl’s father had the main say. If the girl had no father, an uncle would step in. In the absence of any preexisting agreement it seems that the girl’s consent to a marriage was unimportant until the 26th dynasty, when brides also began to have a say.

EGYPTIAN marriage

Little written evidence of either true marriage ceremonies or marriages as a concept has been found. Usually there was a grand party associated with the joining of two people, but we believe it was simply a social affair and had no real religious or legal bearing. Traditionally, the term hemet has been translated as “wife”, but is probably more accurately “female partner”. The legal and social implications of the word are not clear. Interestingly, the word hi is the male counterpart to hemet but seems to have been rarely used. However, this is probably due to funerary text most frequently being related to men, and so the female partner is referred to and defined by her husband. Hebswt is another word that seems to apply to a female partner, but traditionally it has been translated as “concubine”. However, this meaning is less clear because in some New Kingdom text both hemet and hebswt are used at the same time to apparently refer to the same female. It has been suggested that the term hebswt might more accurately describe a second or third wife after the first one died or was divorced. Of course, our modern, romantic concept of marriage is a relationship based on love between partners who consent to share their lives together. But up until the 26th dynasty, relatively late in Egyptian history, the bride herself seems to have little choice in the marriage. In fact, during this time frame most marriage contracts are actually between the girl’s father and future husband. The girl’s father and even her mother had much more say in the matter then the bride. After the 26th dynasty, the bride appears to have had more say in her future husband, and we find phrases in marriage contracts that indicate a more defined relationship. Among common people, polygamy may very well have existed as it obviously did in the royal class, but if so it was rare. We known from excavations such as Deir El Medina that the housing of common people conformed more to monogamy rather then polygamy. Yet from the 13th Dynasty (1795-1650 BC) on polygamy was common among kings and some of the ruling elite. While one principal wife (hemet nesw weret) was chosen, others were probably taken by the king in order to assure a royal heir, or cement relationships with foreign countries or even powerful regional leaders. Kings might have as many as several hundred wives, and in some periods other high officials took more then one wife. Also, the tradition of brother/sister or father/daughter marriages was mostly confined to the royalty of Egypt, at least until the Greek period.

Marriage Tax exemption


Marriage Tax exemption,FIRST FARMAN SIGNED BY SRIKRISHNADEVARAYA

Am empire-wide exemption of the marriage-tax seems to be almost the
first act that the king affected soon after assuming the reins of the
kingdom. This is recorded in a lengthy epigraph (No. 47)